Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Eagles

 The large bird soared high above carefully watching for a meal. There is no problem with flying 50-60 miles each day in search of prey. When fall first approaches the Turkey Vultures head south and the eagles arrive from the north. It is a simple exchange and often in such a short time one forgets how many can be seen each day. This exchange begins again this month when the spring thaws begin and the rivers once frozen offer food in new places. It is sad to see these beautiful eagles leave. They often give one an opportunity  to travel just to watch them. Many days are spent just seeing how close I can get to them. Hours are spent sitting patiently awaiting their movement and hoping they will return to a perch nearby. Soon a side glimpse catches the flutter in the water and down they swoop picking up a fish  and flying to a limb to consume this marine treasure. They sometimes will try to get an easy meal trying to steal what another has caught. These antics  along with a few wrestling moves midair are what one never gets to see unless you watch for a long time. Days can be bitter cold, yet they are still hunting, maybe the cold gives them added energy. When the river freezes, they fly more south to open water and wait for thaws to return to the north. Some will stay and nest, but most of them have better hunting areas to the north.






Here one sits with a immature friend who hasn't molted to the bold colors until they are 3-5 years old.














17 comments:

  1. Oh! You got some Beautiful shots of a Glorious bird!!
    hughugs

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  2. It must be so thrilling to watch them soaring. I could spend hours doing that!

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  3. You have some truly magnificent pictures of eagles here. They are so powerful and in a way so other worldly.

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  4. They are very interesting creatures, and also very interesting when being observed. Great images.

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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  5. Very good pics!!! Excellent!!! I went to the Squaw Creek Wildlife Refuge yesterday. Got some eagle pics, but they're not nearly as good as yours. I'll have to say that all your pics are my favorite today.

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  6. Beautiful pictures. Such magnificent, beautiful creatures.
    Cheri

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  7. A lone eagle is impressive. A group of eagles is amazing. We have eagles all winter as we have a few open areas on the river.

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  8. fantastic shots. What a treat to be able to observe them

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  9. Beautiful. You must be very patient, as they are hard to sneak up on.

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  10. You got some fabulous shots here, Steve. Number 7 is my favorite!

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  11. Steve, this is the third blog post I have seen this a.m. and by far, yiur photos are the most impressive. It's always awe imspiring to see hese majestic birds, but closeups are wonderful!

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  12. By the way, the other bloggers who posted are Grammie's Ramblings (Maine) and A Quiet Corner (CT).

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  13. I LOVE your eagle shots--fabulous!! What a treat to be able to photograph them and to just watch them. Lucky you. Have a great weekend. Mickie :)

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  14. I'm never used to seeing how large these birds are and didn't know about the time frame for their getting their mature feathers. Great shots!

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  15. Wonderful serie, Steve. I love the shots very close.
    Have a nice <week-end !

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  16. beautiful pics. we don't see eagles down here. red shouldered hawks are the largest raptors we have.

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  17. I have never been lucky enough to see one eagle that close, you saw so many of them. Rebecca

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Keep it positive and informative,I enjoy hearing from you!