Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Fun Times Outdoors

Sessile or Toadshade Trillium








Guinea Fowl





Weed Eater, and a very hardy father by the looks of the barn full of babies behind him.





Guard cat








These two baby boys reminded me of a day having fun. They reminded me of when my bothers and I had a good day outside and my mom not seeing the happiness in having gotten a bit dirty.






Barn Quilt


These two barns were side by side and made me think how many families actually stuck it out and stayed farming. The signs on the barns proclaim that pride. The owner stopped while I was taking pictures and asked if I needed any help stopped in the middle of nowhere. He was close to 75 and said he moved there when he was one. Another generation taking the reins. The older barn was dated 1874.























Have you ever paid for a meal for a person sitting by their self in a restaurant? She wondered about many of the single people sitting around her on a holiday. Her salad arrived and she forgot about the few around her, and soon they had all exchanged with others. When you have had lots of family and then it slows down to none could leave an empty feeling when many families are getting together around you. She smiled and greeted a lady when she left, full after a eating her holiday meal, for one. Lucky for her some extended family had invited her for a late meal. They had to work for the holiday and missed part of their family meal. She thought more about buying that meal for a stranger sometime, it could make someone’s day really brighten.





Driving along the roadside flowers blew kisses at her and told her to stop. It was hard not to when the color really was showing for a first time that year. Stopping in a park she relived some old memories of having been here with her family as a child. It always had a charm for her. Roving around a corner she started seeing some of the more recent blooms she had seen in another park two days before. Huge trees filled this river lowland, some lying down from previous floods. Soon she saw a patch of blue just ahead of her and was amazed at the beauty she stood in. Everywhere around bloomed bluebells tall and bright. It was almost like a fantasy picture seeing this black and brown landscape glow with such a heavenly color. Walking down a trail she found where they finally stopped. It was amazing to have found this walking even slower to be able and see each patch. Walking back she stopped at her car and took her camera to a bird watching blind and enjoyed another treat this park had to offer.





Driving home she noticed a greenhouse. It was hard to pass this one and she hoped to find a fruit tree for her home. She looked at new arrivals first and had to go get a bigger box to fill with wants and wishes. It is funny how she had an armload before she found the trees. She saw one that might do, but would have to look it up when she got home. A few new friends fit well with her other finds, and she hoped it would dry up a bit to plant. When she made it to her truck she felt she should have gotten something else, but went on home instead.





She woke up to bright sunshine the next morning and went out and watched the sun come up. It would be a good day for a hike. Wait, she felt a twinge and then realized it was mushroom season. Perhaps there was enough warmth to get a good sack of these delightful little delicacies. A call came and a friend asked what was going on. She said a hike, not wanting a crowd after her mushrooms. It sounded good so off they went to a trail for a hike. Passing a few good-looking trees, she pulled over and said she needed to see if any were out. Her friend stayed in the truck and off she headed, deep into the woods. She looked to no avail and came back commenting on the blooms she had seen. After a few more miles they came to the park. Off she shot into the woods, the mushroom fever heavy. Her friend was soon left behind bidding a welcome to plants she hadn’t seen. She crouched and smelled the air for a musty smell. Being low to the ground sometimes gave one the advantage. She tried to imagine what sound they made when emerging. It was like a burst of energy when she even thought of the good harvests she had. There were none to be seen today however, but it was a nice day out in the woods. She heard a voice and soon caught sight of her friend.



































21 comments:

  1. ...we have been seeing some of the same plants. Loved the barns...1874--cool! I can only imagine how hard the settlers had to work back then...

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  2. Love that horse with the white shock of mane blowing every which way! Made my day. :)

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  3. lovely post! thanks



    Warm Aloha from Honolulu


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  4. Hey Steve, beautiful pictures. I love the barn quilts, they are slowly making their way to my area. When I have to drive to Bowling Green, there are always barn quilts that I look for.

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  5. So neat that you were able to speak with the owner of the one barn. Living there since 1 ! Wow! Now thats really putting down some roots :)

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  6. We're heading your way - stopped tonight in Rock Springs, Wyoming. It looks very different from our home in the Pacific Northwest!

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  7. It is sad to see so many of the family farms fall by the wayside.

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  8. wonderful views of your world.
    your trilliums look quite different than ours, fun to see.

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  9. I hope the young woman follows up on her intention to buy a meal for a single diner. She does seem to go off in a new direction as the mood hits.

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  10. I sure can understand this. Where I live family is everything... and mine is a world away. I've tried to explain before that it is harder to be away from family when everyone else is gathering in groups...but people have a hard time understanding that. Thank you for this, Steve.

    Beautiful beautiful pictures...the old man who moved there when he was one! What a legacy.

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  11. Barns are very typic. I have the pleasure to see some when we drive across Utah and the nearby states. I met horses, eagles, deers, antilops, bisons and only one bear. I love the amrican prairies, Steve.

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  12. Boy! Spring is really starting to take Hole there! I Love the animals! And I've never seen a Toadshade! Beautiful!
    hughugs

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  13. Those barns are amazing - and the people who care for them, even more!
    Just wondering...How did your friends enjoy driving around Egypt?
    Blessings!
    Ann
    PS Those horses - they really do look like little boys playing!

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  14. trilliums are so interesting and pre-historic looking. we have some down here but different.

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  15. So much life out there! Yeah! Thanks for these great pictures!

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  16. I love the old barns and the countryside. Those two horses are cute. That old goat was a busy boy huh? Ha! Ha! I've never seen Guinea Fowl. I love the look on that cat's face too.. Love your stories Steve.

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  17. One time, we were in a drive-through line at a favorite ice cream place; and, when we arrived at the window and tried to pay, we were advised that the folks in the car that had been in front of us had paid for our order. We had no idea who they were. It was just a random act of kindness. It made our day.

    My dad used to hunt morrel mushrooms. He loved them. I never developed a taste for them myself.

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  18. Like the weed eater :) Nice to hear about family farms making through the generations.
    I've never bought dinner for a person eating along but it's a nice thought. I'll have to remember that the next time I'm out

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  19. Very cool that they date their barns.

    I've never seen a flower like that one in the first picture before.

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  20. HI Steve, I always loves seeing your pictures as you travel the countryside. Bet you do meet some interesting people along the way. Farming is hard --but the people who do farm are FABULOUS, hard-working American people. Love the Quilt Barn.

    Let's pray for all who lost so much due to the Tornadoes on Wednesday. We were some of the lucky ones.

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  21. Hi, just found your blog from my friend Andrew's. This post reminds me of when my girlfriend and I hit the country roads on the weekends on the way to hiking spots. We always wonder what those quilt-looking things are on the side of barns. Thanks for sharing!

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Keep it positive and informative,I enjoy hearing from you!