Saturday, March 26, 2011

New Pastures
















His friend picked him up at the train station and it was a three-hour ride to get to the farm. It was nice to have this new line, since it was three days ride from his home. He enjoyed these gentle mountains carved by a mighty river. Cold-water streams were full of trout and there were numerous ideas created to paint and draw. It was so overwhelming his host often had to plead with him to come and enjoy dinner with his family. This would be a fun month trying to mix his work with play.

When he awoke early the next day he decided to fish for awhile before a day of work. On his first cast his line went taunt and he held the fish until it had wrapped around a tree limb. He traded poles and waited for his captive to perhaps unhook itself. The water was so clear he could see the trout slowly becoming weary. Not wanting to lose this prize he followed the line into the pool. It was a lot deeper than what it looked, but he was still unable to reach the stranded fish. Holding his breath he blindly grabbed at the fish and snared it with his hand. It was a valiant battle again with the powerful fish trying to squirm free. With a triple flip and grab the fish was on the bank and into a bucket of water to revive it. He lay back in the grass to dry off, watching hummingbirds feed on some jewelweed.

The day passed quickly, and he didn’t get home until late afternoon. Maybe tomorrow would offer a better work ethic. Instead it mirrored the previous day, shy of having to rescue fish off a tree limb. After telling fish stories all evening he awoke early the next day with fish fever. He went back to the same area, with more expertise not to snag as much. Well not quite as much, but had to leave when he ran out of hooks.

After five weeks he had a few pieces finished and many in the works. His fishing abilities had increased, eating it sometimes for all three meals. There was certain happiness he received sitting next to these beautiful streams. They talked to him it seemed, as a mother would talk to a young child, and he never worried about time passing. Fairies snickered nearby, happy that he had found the spirit carried in this lovely area. His final day they took canoes upstream and floated down a lovely river. He held up his hands to the sky many times, thanking the land for the happiness he felt when he was up here. A gentle breeze gathered these praises and passed them all over the land to all that would enjoy this happiness.
...
..
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One thing I have found out
Is to listen to what all have to say.
Gaining a wealth of knowledge each day
Makes us stronger and our lives so lovely.















17 comments:

  1. Your photos triggered happy memories of crossing the Mississippi by ferr this winter. We had to wait a bit and walked along the flat bank that sloped down from the levee. It was a very modern, efficient ferry. Cost to cross: $1.00 per vehicle, waaaay to low for about 10 cars. Ahhhh, nature and man, eternal conflicts.

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  2. I am having trouble posting this. Got caught up on latest blogs. Great pics. I really like Lilly's closeup. Is that a rabbit skin? What do you think that limestone building used to be?

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  3. Again I dont know what I enjoyed more..
    The beautiful and beautifully told story or the amazing photographs.
    Have a great weekend.
    Costas

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  4. I loved the shot of the brick house. I really thought it caught it right.

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  5. It's nice to see Lily able to go out about the prairie without her coat at last. The stone building is interesting. Any idea what it was used for? And what furry creature's pelt did you photograph?

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  6. Reading that story made me hungry for a fish dinner :)
    Is that one picture a deer carcass or do I need to put on my glasses?

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  7. That last barn looks like one strong wind & it's going down! As always, so many great pics :)

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  8. The stone building was a barrack for soldiers in the late 1800's. The compact carcass is what is left of a deer.

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  9. Always an interesting collection of photos. I love the Lily tasting the spring air, and that last shot is startling but beautiful.

    I haven't replied to comments on my own blog post yet but when I read yours about having a special hat for when you're out looking for mushrooms, I thought "That must be his mushroom cap." ;)

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  10. You sure have access to some wonderful places! Awesome photos, as always!

    You asked me if my rosemary plants get leggy. Yes, they do, a bit, and that's the part I cut off when I cook with it. Right now, I only see a couple stems starting to get a bit leggy on the last inch or so. When they get outside, they will firm up. The garden window they are in is on the east side of the house.

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  11. Steve, I too was curious about the stone building, but read the snwer in the earlier comments reply. It's amazing that the building is still standing and seems in fairly good condition, but then stone would outlast the older wood structures. Looking at the remains of the deer was a bit sad.

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  12. thank you for this wisdom delivered beautifully.




    Aloha to you
    from Honolulu!


    Comfort Spiral

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  13. Your blog is so relaxing (even with the imagery of the fish being grabbed!)... I love it! Thank you for the beautiful photos and writing.

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  14. Retrieving a trout wrapped around a root in deep water.... yup been there done that. :)

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  15. A FABULOUS picture of sweet Lily, but so sad for the fox! :(

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  16. Love the stone building!
    Sorry to be late!!
    hughugs

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  17. Love the photos and story. Your pup looks a lot like mine.

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Keep it positive and informative,I enjoy hearing from you!