Sunday, December 26, 2010

Sharing Peace And Harmony

A gall with a tiny opening where its inhabitant escaped appears almost like a birdhouse.



In Native American lore some tribes claimed to have entered this world climbing up tree roots from the center of the Earth. These stories were often exchanged to look at the heritage of each tribe. I thought of this story when I found this shot, it was home to Sauk and Fox tribes pushed away from the Mississippi by incoming settlers from Europe. I will have to see how deep it goes when I can figure a safe way to get down to it on the slippery slopes.








His arrival into a new home was wonderful. He had been traveling for two years, and now had a tiny prairie home near the river. He spent days cleaning and repairing a number of tiny needs. The cabin had been neglected for a few years, with the previous occupants running out of funds to do simple repairs.

He walked down to the river and enjoyed the gentle waters rolling by. They seemed to be telling a story, in a simple song, as the water broke over rocks in front of him. He thought of the water being one of the oldest residents in this wonderful land. It had seen all that had occurred and understood how to survive in an ever-changing world.

Fairies whispered to a water nymph what beautiful images this man had made of the land with his paintings. He seemed to have the grace that emphasized the most beautiful views and scenery to be found in this land. It was simple for him since he saw a picture in everything he enjoyed in nature. Being out in this prairie gave him energy he never knew he had, until he began to really understand how powerful nature could be.

That night he went to a hill out in a prairie area and sketched until the sunset. The wind seemed to increase his wisdom and desire to learn more about this area. He came back every evening until he felt he had made a bond with this land, and would try harder to show how wonderful it could be with his art and writings.

One morning he went out, and was disappointed to see his bloom being mowed for hay. He stopped and talked with the landowner. When he left they had agreed to share some of his hay and spread it near the new cabin. Every time his neighbor mowed he spread the golden hay hoping to pass seeds and develop a similar area. He gave him one of his paintings hoping to see the same some day in his own yard. His hope and praise for this land was promising, but often scoffed at by local farmers. His spirit clung to hope and was carried away on a gentle prairie breeze.
;0)

We need to look at our today’s
Understanding they create our tomorrow’s
And build our confidence to build
Love and compassion for all we meet.










19 comments:

  1. Beautiful post. I loved the root photo and the history of Native American Lore--interesting. I liked the story too...

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  2. A beautiful tale and wonderful images as always. I love the tree lore.

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  3. Always enjoy the picture of the ever-present Lily. Hope your holiday was a good one, Steve.

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  4. Great photos. Reminds me how beautiful winter can be with out all the colors of the other seasons.

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  5. Am I the only one who didn't know what a gall was? I had to look it up. Very interesting. Beautiful pictures, all; but I confess that I'm partial to the ones of fungi growing on old logs. The fungi add a little color to the dreary winter landscape.

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  6. Very interesting about the Native American lore. Of course the pictures are just wonderful and the story quite lovely.

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  7. Steve,
    That is so true...we have such an impact on the tomorrows of others and often don't realize that strength.
    Thanks for stopping by today~ We had a lovely day playing in the snow and all are tired but content. Enjoy your evening!

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  8. A wonderful story and beautiful photos.

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  9. Awesome post and truly beautiful photos!

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  10. So positive and heartwarming. What is a gall?

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  11. Plant galls are plant tissue which is inhabited by an insect. Galls act as both the habitat and food source for the maker of the gall. The interior of a gall will contain edible starch and other tissues. This one was about 1 inch around and may have had a wasp species in it.They plant an egg, it causes the stem to swell until the larvae becomes mature and then it eats its way out.

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  12. I do so love it when Fairies Whisper.

    Beautiful writing...hope your Christmas was wonderful!

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  13. Never heard of a Gall! Cool info!!
    And, being of Cherokee desent...I DO feel like I crawled up from a root....Hahaa! My feet are cold today!
    Happy New Year sweetie!!
    hughugs

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  14. I scrolled down and got caught up with your amazing photos! I enjoyed reading the story from when your neighbor put up your Christmas lights. Are you all healed from your motorcycle accident? My husband bought a 1974 Honda 390 this summer. (I think I have the right numbers.)

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  15. Steve, just catching up on a few past posts and enjoyed seing your Christmas decos and tree. Seems like you might have gotten a bit less snow than here on the VA eastern shore. We spent most of today digging out, but I did take time to watch the birds at the feeders. The new camera is getting a good workout this week.

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  16. I just enjoyed your beautiful photos and I appreciate your writting.

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  17. I like the story of the Indians climbing up the roots.

    I like your description of nature's power. She can also be very subtle and gentle.

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  18. So wonderful photography of the woods,the nature's beauty and litle marvels...fabulous; even without sun...there is a lot of light in your imagines....fantastic!!!

    Have a wonderful, happy new year and take care!!
    Thanks so very much for your kind comments!

    ciao ciao elvira

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Keep it positive and informative,I enjoy hearing from you!