Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Prairie Story 26- Times Remembered

Tiny Arrowroot blooms reflect in the water. This root can add an onion flavor to a stew.

A more recent bloom out on the prairie, Echinacea pallida or "Pale Coneflower". I spent a whole day looking at the various specimens, this has a smooth slender leaf. Many of you may have taken this as a cold remedy.

Giant Honey Locust thorns were used for a variety of purposes by Native Americans, one as fish hooks. They really sting even with a small scratch, but are unique to look at.


I saved this Blue Dasher from a spider, it flew into a web near my feet along with a smaller damsel. Took a while to regain composure and they both flew off. There were a lot more bugs for the spider around this lake, and I wasn't sure if it was still in residence at this web.

Lythraceae, "Winged Loosestrife", common in marshy areas or wet prairies. This was next to Lake Keomah, in a beautiful little state park I visit often.
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All of their children had left this wonderful homestead, and came back from time to time. This was only to leave again hoping to never return. There were new pathways to take, but their old ones remained. She and her husband often walked these pathways, finding the hidden memories left behind by their children, and now their children’s children. Fairies danced in delight at the wonderful spirit evoked over the decades, and often frolicked through their meadow picking flowers. Grandchildren loved to eat the fruits and vegetables grown on this land. The love and compassion over the years made these fruits of labor taste far better than anyone else’s did. Their hard life had taken such a turn-around. It did not seem like that long ago, they were both pulling massive sacks of cotton, in hot, dry fields. The laughter spread up from the stream and was carried off on the wind as a dream, for many to enjoy.

The next morning a mail courier came to their home with a letter of despair. Their oldest son had gotten caught between two railroad car couplings, and left this world. They had not unhooked the cars at his plea until he said goodbye to his dear wife. The steel made a tight hold on his delicate life, and he passed away after saying his good-byes to family. The land giveth, and taketh away. It can be a hard land, but yet so gracious. Life continues on, in a gentle profusion of love and compassion.

They planted two new apple trees in memory of their son. This seemed to be a fruit of love, a steadfast symbol of the song of life. This simple song spoke as each shovel full of dirt was dug. It added a harmony when they filled the hole and watered the new trees with love and affection. He held his hands up and asked for happiness for all that he loved and blessings to his son in Heaven. The blessing was repeated again and he sank down in tears. These tears were dried, with a gentle prairie breeze, and were carried into eternity.
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There are times when we can’t be together
We still hold on strong to each other
Through lasting memories held in our hearts
Warming our thoughts when we are apart.


6 comments:

  1. yes..beautiful word about nature...good images!

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  2. Sad but sweet story. And of course your photos are fabulous. It was that dragonflies lucky day when you came along.

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  3. Lovely story. Popped in to say hi. Love the Blue Dasher photo!

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  4. You blow me away into another mind frame and time frame. I'm not complaining.:)

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  5. Thanks for the great input. As I shared a tragic moment in a life, this accident really did happen to a son of a proud railroad family, a classmate of mine. The couplings held like a tourniquet until he shared a last goodbye.I moved it back a few generations to stay within realm of my ever continueing story out on the prairie.

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Keep it positive and informative,I enjoy hearing from you!