Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Prairie Story 21-Generations

________Flowers make me smile, they carry an air of happiness always for me.__________

My dill with its tiny little yellow flowers has visits from a variety of pollinators. I like the flavor of this to add to all my foods and make a terrific gravy I learned when I was in the Czech Republic.

When it gets warm so do your radishes so I let them go to seed. The pods are a great addition to a salad or stir fry. This fly seems to like the perch it offers on the delicate white blooms.

Zinnias always remind me of my childhood, a good flower my mother always grew to bring inside for our table. I try to have all kinds of shapes and sizes.

Pink is a color that has a garden appeal. I picked zinnia seeds from a giant row I had and after about three years they went back to the pink parent plants, with a terrible shape for the blooms. Two uglies made a perfect color spectrum and shape. A friend was a florist so I would plant a huge row down the middle of my big garden for her, the bees and my kids to have fun picking.

"
'
"
'

Having been retired from the school for a number of years allowed him time to really enjoy his family. His son had married and gave them a first grandchild, but it was a short marriage, and they rarely saw this child. His wife had some early senility problems so they had moved to a home with some skilled care in a larger city. Their son followed with his new family, he married a lady with two children. When his daughter had her first child, a girl, and she came down to stay for a week when the baby was ready to travel. His son and new wife had their first child the next year and he became a very proud grandparent, trying to spend time with all of them as much as he could. Maybe a bit too much, felt his son’s new wife. He irritated her when he came in from a garden they shared, and washed his hands in her kitchen, not the bathroom.

Such a feeble error to be disdained for. These are some of the simple failures we all have in life, and don’t realize we are doing it, or don’t recognize it until you lose the person. This was to happen, and whittle this family down a bit. Three years later he lost his dear wife. His love was supreme for this lady, even in he final years where she forgot whom he was. The next ten months were tough and he passed away, some say from a broken heart. It was a bad heart, as he had earlier, but it was also a trait that killed most of the males in the family. The next year the heart problem ran its course a bit different and struck his daughter, leaving behind her five-year old daughter with her helpless husband. An aunt would come live for a few years, but moved away after not having much luck getting the father or daughter to mind. She and her father lived a very eclectic lifestyle, but happily in their own existence.

This left the eclectic twosome and his son’s family of six children. Not a very large group considering the first generation patriarchal family was eleven, and this was four generations later. With the changing of the generations so changed the family unit now and they became very loose and disorganized. New bonds formed with new friends, and an extended family came into place. These people often joined for the holidays, and a few other special occasions. This taught the children how to give themselves to others and share their knowledge and spirit. In fact they gave themselves to new families in their married years and fragmented even further, but still kindred to a prairie spirit. Sometimes this spirit was lost because they failed to look well enough, when they had a chance. The spirit lingers on as the smooth prairie winds greet the cities and the universe, carrying her wonderful song, giving us that chance to listen.
.
.
..
.
.
He waved the smoldering cedar bark
Under his chin, and to the four winds
Purifying his soul, so it can feel free
To enter someone’s life, so lovingly.



6 comments:

  1. One day I will add Dill to my herb garden. Thanks for the tip about radishes. I always seem to plant them to late....and they bolt on me very year. Never knew that the seed pods where good to eat.

    Is this "story" about your family?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Zinnias were some I also remember from my childhood. My grandma used to plant those a lot. I always remember helping my grandparents with there small garden. I forget the names of the flowers and the plants until I read them on the web. Then some great memories come flooding back.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I tried to comment on your blog yesterday and kept getting a message that only team members were allowed to comment. Thought I would come back and try again :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. So glad you reminded me about Zinnias - they ARE the perfect flower to cut and decorate the table! They grow so easily, as well. I can't imagine a grave made from dill but I trust your good taste ;-)

    What a joy to write - and you do it so well! Have you thought about preserving your blog? I think of my blog as a diary and hope that someday my grandsons will get to know me through my published blog. I get mine done here:

    http://blog2print.sharedbook.com/blogworld/printmyblog/index.html

    Check it out if you haven't already. I've had several copies made and I love them!

    ReplyDelete

Keep it positive and informative,I enjoy hearing from you!