Friday, May 14, 2010

Prairie story 12-Love,peace and happiness











Winter became bleak living out in the country, so he found a place to stay in the city, so he might see people once in a while. He started working volunteer and sent photos and writings to others to share. He was becoming part of a new community and he liked the feel, but missed his lake home. He tried to go outdoors each day to avoid cabin fever. It worked for a bit, but when nice weather opened up he moved into the campgrounds at a park, living in a tent. This was a carefree life, having a hard time to decide whether to bike or go fishing. Simplicity can make one happier since it is making life easier. The other part was it was also cheaper so he could live easier on savings and a small research stipend.




Every two weeks would be a change of site, and it became fun to become part of a community of others living simple. There became a band of campers who all rotated through the campgrounds, so it became a small city. There was even talk of voting in a mayor at one point in jest. The tent was big; it was to hold eight, but fit one comfortable. One night during a terrible spring storm, the tent moved back and forth with the storm’s fury. His tent fly snapped and flew away in a perfect spiral. Totally naked he tried to hold the tent down lying near the door, but the storm lifted him clear off the ground. Poles snapped like tinder for a fire and he had to abandon ship and retreat to his van. He was happy to have warm clothes and a spare sleeping bag to curl up in. The next day his neighbor in a moterhome said he had watched him, but when he got in the van figured everything was under control. A waterspout was sighted on the lake less than a quarter mile away and tornado sirens sounded in all the surrounding towns. He asked him if he heard him cuss, but his wife said the storm was too loud to hear much else. This was good, a few words slipped out, but at least they hadn’t noticed the lack of clothes.




Large carp started hitting real well on the lake and biking became a number two sport. Using a lightweight pole and tackle really made a sport catching these behemoths of nature. His reel wore out just as daily rains started raising the lake level thirty feet. Biking became number one again and fishing hit the wayside. Training encouraged some strenuous rides to get in shape for a ride across state. Maybe he would meet someone who shared the same interests and liked the outdoors as well as he did. When he rode he often greeted the animals as Mother, Brother and Sister. It seemed funny how it was more Brother Hawk than Sister, birds were sometimes hard to sex. It was more a respect for all of nature around him. People sometime where caught off guard when you rode up on them on the trails, so he often hailed a greeting when getting close. He had one double dip hill that he offered his prayer of happiness to all he loved, reciting off names until he made it through his list and up the hills.




He changed lakes and campgrounds, camping next to a rather frustrated mother and her patient daughter. He asked if they rode bikes and tried to find out if there was a husband in the picture. They were having a hard time setting up camp and he watched joyfully at their actions. Soon it was set and he showed the daughter a few pictures while mom kept trying to rearrange the stuff they had brought with them. They adopted him for the weekend and soon had three generations of family camping along with two boats. He slipped away while they blazed on into the night. The next day the grandfather started breakfast and off everyone went to boat and ski. Lunch was already fixed in another cooler, huge ham sandwiches, which were traditional fare for a family outing. Dinner became a combination of what everyone had, he shared some great pastries, cheese and meat he had gotten the day before. After a few days it was a sad moment to all quit this riotous fun and go home. They set a date to meet the next month.




Familialismo was a Spanish term to describe a central family structure, and one of the most beautiful words he had found. It meant a lot to him with such a small family; he was very close to his extended family as well. This was a collection of neighbors and friends that had influenced him. When he told his story of life it entailed all of these people. These people were all part of his spiritual network, and extension of one’s self. Good or bad, all you have performed in life forms a history, and you are number one. This is where we should be throughout our lives. It offers you an incentive to enrich the lives of others, propelling a pyramid of love, peace and happiness. This large set of emotions floats across the land on a gentle prairie breeze.




So many times our lives
Are the same as many others
But we fail to see how close
Everyone in this world can be.

4 comments:

  1. But we fail to see how close
    Everyone in this world can be.

    "Everyone" includes those in the wild.

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  2. We often get so wrapped-up in our lives that we forget to see this truth. Thanks for the reminder. Wishing you Peace, Love, and Happiness!

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  3. On the blog you have amazing photos. I like to photograph his son Matěj. Have a nice day Radka.

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  4. I don't know if it's because Nebraska is my home, but I've always felt that people from the plains are more accepting of new people into their lives. Perhaps it is because of the solitude the pioneers endured and we just continued the custom of enjoying a little company.
    This is a wonderful blog. You are the Featured Site of the Week in Nature Center Magazine.

    Emma

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Keep it positive and informative,I enjoy hearing from you!